public event

start date

29-01-2022

end date

29-01-2022

time

10:30 - 12:30

price

bpf members £ 0.00
non-bpf members £ 25.00

bpf Annual Lecture - the birth and death of HOPE

We all need hope at the moment, especially when it feels as though Pandora’s box has been opened and unleashed a series of catastrophes on the world.  Hope is born when, in Winnicott’s words, the mother's love, displayed as human reliability, gives the baby a sense of trust, or of confidence in the environmental factor.

This capacity to hope can be destroyed in a number of ways, throughout life.   The death of hope can lie disguised and hidden beneath a range of emotions and attitudes- despair, shame, masochism and a sadistic coercive control of others and of one’s own mind and emotions. Anything hopeful is immediately killed off, even leading to attempts to control time itself and retreat into a fantasy world where nothing new can ever happen.  In the consulting room, the therapist may feel under increasing pressure to be effective, as though their therapeutic credibility depends on proving their potency by rescuing the patient from hopeless despair.

Psychotherapists also need to take into account the powerful socio-economic and cultural factors that contribute to the long-term and insidious loss of hope in disadvantaged groups in society and  also be able to think about loss of hope in the face of a range of potential catastrophes that affect us all.

 

About the speaker

Dr Jean Knox is a psychiatrist and a Jungian analyst with a relational and attachment-based approach. Her PhD on the effect of emotion on memory and perception was at the Psychoanalysis Unit at UCL, supervised by Professor Peter Fonagy. She is Honorary Associate Professor at the University of Exeter, for the Doctorate in Clinical Practice and the Professional Qualifying Training in Psychodynamic and Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy. She is a Senior Member and Trustee of the British Psychotherapy Foundation and former Editor-in -Chief of the Journal of Analytical Psychology. She has written and taught extensively on the relevance of research in attachment theory and developmental neuroscience to psychotherapy theory and practice. Her book Archetype, Attachment, Analysis: Jungian Psychology and the Emergent Mind was published in 2003. Her book ‘Self-Agency in Psychotherapy: Attachment, Autonomy and Intimacy’ was published in December 2011, in the WW Norton Interpersonal Neurobiology series.

 

 


bpf members £ 0.00
non-bpf members £ 25.00